POET AND SONGWRITER JEREMY IVEY RELEASES
NEW MARGO PRICE-PRODUCED ALBUM
‘WAITING OUT THE STORM’ TODAY, LISTEN
HERE

‘WAITING OUT THE STORM’ ART OPENING AT NASHVILLE’S
VINYL TAP TONIGHT

JEREMY IVEY OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE AT NASHVILLE’S
THE BASEMENT TOMORROW, OCTOBER 17

Today Jeremy Ivey has released his sophomore album Waiting Out The Storm, which finds Ivey expanding his sound and lyricism with an electricity coursing through his veins and a passionate sense of urgency in his words; listen to it HERE. On this record Ivey takes a wider look at the world around us—the landscape, the people that populate it, and the ways in which we help each other survive against all odds. “Though Ivey wrote the material two years ago, the songs are prescient, deconstructing the ills of the day — among them racism, xenophobia and the growing wealth gap — with a critic’s precision and a poet’s compassion,” declared the Nashville Scene.

A free spirit before establishing his current roots in Nashville, Ivey journeyed across the United States, living in a tent in Colorado and eventually spending a period of time homeless in Boston. These lived experiences inform Ivey’s songwriting to this very day. Under the multifarious sounds that comprise Waiting Out the Storm—a record that spans Beatles-esque psychedelia, driving folk-rock, and the type of full-band barnburners that Neil Young and Crazy Horse are known for—that streak of empathy shines brightly.

Ivey wrote most of this album on the road with frequent collaborator, wife, and country phenom Margo Price, taking a lyrics-first approach for the first time in his career—and Price, who also produced The Dream and the Dreamer, joined him in the booth again here. “I work so quickly that I just wanted to not have to get anyone else involved,” he enthuses. “I trust her, and it’s good to have her there to reassure me.” Waiting Out the Storm is as much a showcase for Ivey’s band the Extraterrestrials as well, with a full-bodied and unmistakably human sound that makes you feel as if you were just a few feet away from seeing them on the stage.

“I decided to be political, but not so strongly one-sided about it,” he continues when speaking on Waiting Out the Storm‘s lyrical themes. “Some of these songs are about things that are current, but they could also be true 30 years from now.”

Early on in his COVID-19 quarantine, Jeremy took up painting as a new hobby and source of artistic inspiration. Tonight from 6 – 8 PM, Ivey and Nashville record store Vinyl Tap will co-host a Waiting Out The Storm art opening, the first-ever public viewing of Jeremy’s paintings. Capacity will be limited and wearing a mask is required to attend. Entry is first come first serve, with social distancing guidelines in mind. Entry is guaranteed if attendees pre-order Waiting Out The Storm with Vinyl Tap via email, phone or at the store in-person.Email [email protected]vinyltapnashville.com for more info.

Jeremy will also be holding the first concert at Nashville venue The Basement since the pandemic began. Taking place outside in the venue’s parking lot tomorrow night on Saturday October 17, tickets can be bought in pods of four and seating is limited. Masks are required to enter and must be worn at all times. Additional details and ticket information can be found HERE.

Early Praise for ‘Waiting Out The Storm’

“rollicking, punk-infused, political alt-country” – BrooklynVegan

“It’s funny stuff that fits the loose, freewheeling arrangement of the song, which brings to mind Faces and the jammy “Get Back” era of the Beatles.” – Rolling Stone on “Things Could Get Much Worse”

“A person just ‘Waiting Out the Storm’ is not doing enough, even though none of us can control the weather.” – PopMatters

“It’s not a preachy record by any means, but it does stir some sentiments and speak to those issues and concerns that have forced Americans to wake up and take notice, no matter which side of the divide they happen to be on.” – American Songwriter

Few current artists have so effectively married searing rock n’ roll with equally biting lyricism. Yet, Ivey’s skill in wading through this gloomy landscape is his ability to make observations and raise questions rather than preach. And again, his band drives these tunes hard, making this a strong contender for one of the year’s best.” – Glide Magazine

L to R: Margo Price + Jeremy Ivey in the studio recording ‘Waiting Out The Storm’
Photo Credit: Colin Quinn

JEREMY IVEY

Order ‘Waiting Out The Storm’

1. Tomorrow People
2. Paradise Alley
3. Movies
4. Hands Down In Your Pockets
5. White Shadow
6. Things Could Get Much Worse
7. Someone Else’s Problem
8. Loser Town
9. What’s The Matter Esther
10. How It Has To Be

JEREMY IVEY
www.jeremyivey.net
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