COLD YEARS release music video for ’62 (My Generation’s Falling Apart)’ from the forthcoming album ‘Paradise’

Aberdeen quartet Cold Years are excited to present the music video for62 (My Generation’s Falling Apart),’ the latest track to be lifted from the band’s highly anticipated, forthcoming debut album titled Paradise out in 2020. Heavily based on the concept of kids TV shows that portrayed an idealistic, naive view of the world which, naturally as children, we all believed, ’62’ is a lighthearted satire of shows such as Blue Peter (which has aired on the BBC since the late-’50s) where the band, dressed as questionable TV presenters of days gone by, present some of the serious themes which have since been discovered are more accurate of reality.

“The song theme plays heavily on the tough times that particularly young people are experiencing right now, not just in Scotland or the UK but anywhere in the world where the political climate and resulting decisions have left our generation adrift,” the band said. “The starkest manifestation of this is Brexit, which has seen Scotland leave the EU against the will of 62% of the population. It’s this 62% of our country that we took inspiration for the song title. But this is a song for everyone across the world who feels angry and misrepresented by the status quo.”

COLD YEARS – ’62 (My Generation’s Falling Apart)’ (Official Music Video)

As the true sound of worldwide youth disaffection post-Trump and post-Brexit, the songs of Paradise – a sarcastic snarl aimed at the band’s remote hometown – burst from the speakers with a ‘clear eyes, full hearts, can’t lose’ spirit. Spring-boarding off timelessly vintage-tinged sounds and fuelled by lung-busting choruses buffed-up through a modern-day, blue-collar punk rock sheen, Paradise captures the anger and frustration vocalist Ross Gordon feels for a generation in decline.

Echoing the infamous, despairing “it’s shite being Scottish” rant made by protagonist Renton in Irvine Welsh’s 1993 novel, Trainspotting, Cold Years frontman Ross Gordon’s near-nihilistic take on the town where he was born goes further still, almost three decades and a generation later. Rather than succumb to the pitfalls that laid waste to previous generations, however, he poured all of his grievances into his band’s debut showcase, Paradise 13 songs of passion and belief that unapologetically breathe the redemptive fire of rock’n’roll.

“There’s an ongoing narrative about how fucked everything is at the moment,” Gordon says of the thread that ties otherwise disparate themes together. “It links everything, really, not just purely politics: It’s linked to the economy, to drugs and alcohol, and what our generation is going through right now. You work hard in school, you train for your career and you try to succeed at it, but the reality is that none of it really fucking matters. It’s a record that’s angry because, as a generation, we feel like we’ve been sold short.”

Naturally, the creation of an album instilled with such an inflamed sense of injustice didn’t come without its difficulties. It was a challenging process that often tested the collective patience of the quartet, completed by guitarist Finlay Urquhart, bassist Louis Craighead, and drummer Fraser Allan. But such was the passion that each member invested into it, paired with an indomitable spirit, that the band has made good on the past few years of promise. Rather than rushing out a record for the sake of expediency, taking time to reflect, be honest, and pour everything the band had into the process has made for a set of songs that will endure and stand the Scots in admirable stead. After all, you only get one shot at making your first album, so you better make it the best it can be.

Considering the unforgiving, harsh, and often dismal depths from which Paradise was born, it’s an album that strives for optimism, and Cold Years know who they are and staying true to their roots. And despite a journey ahead that promises to send them far and wide, they won’t ever forget where they came from even if it is rubbish

“I went through a divorce, different jobs, different flats, different girls … And I tried to cover everything that’s happened in the past few years,” Gordon says of the self-examination he underwent on these tracks. “I really am grateful for the opportunity that we’ve got. Every single day. It’s a huge thing. It’s going to be a lot of work, but it’s meant to be hard because nothing worthwhile doing is ever easy. We worked really hard on this record. We had to, and I’m proud of it.”

PARADISE
1) 31
2) Life With A View
3) Night Like This
4) Northern Blue
5) Breathe
6) The Waits
7) Burn The House Down
8) Electricity
9) Too Far Gone
10) Hold On
11) Dropout
12) 62 (My Generation’s Falling Apart)
13) Hunter
https://lnk.to/cy-paradise

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