Beach Slang // The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City // Album Review
Beach Slang // The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City // Album Review 8
Beach Slang // The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City // Album Review 8
Beach Slang // The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City // Album Review 8
Beach Slang // The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City // Album Review 8
Beach Slang // The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City // Album Review 8
8Overall Score
Reader Rating: (4 Votes)
9.7

Over the past few years, Beach Slang has been an ever-growing name within the world of American Rock and Roll. With two albums that have shot the band upwards at an incredible speed, fans are finally being treated to a third release.

Starting out the album is All The Kids In LA, a short but sweet demonstration of the bands sound that’ll work its way into your ears and get you hooked instantly from the aggressive guitar and pounding drums. Leading from this is Let It Ride, that effortlessly blends 80’s rock with punk musicianship. Track 3, Bam Rang Rang is the first of the tracks to truly grab me thanks to the blend of Alt-Rock vocals and Punk instrumentals that get your blood pumping with ease.

Next up is Tommy in The 80’s and is dedicated to Tommy Keene who unfortunately passed away in 2017. The song is a throwback to classic 80’s rock all wrapped up in a Power-Pop bow. While the song is a great dedication to a fantastic musician, I feel like it interrupts the flow of the album and pulls listeners out of the tone that was set by the previous tracks. The same can be said about track 5, Nobody Say Nothing, which is an acoustic ballad that feeds into the repetitive but short Nowhere Bus. 

From there we return to the more aggressive sound that fits the band much better. Track 7, Stiff, brings the heaviness back with an almost Grunge-Approach with the simple but catchy guitar and lyrics all being carried by a groove-filled bass line. Born To Raise Hell and Sticky Thumbs are more of the fast, Punk filled Rock and Roll sound that the band have mastered. Kicking Over Bottles slows the album down again but in a much more cohesive manner, scrapping some of the Punk approaches to be a classic 80’s rock anthem. Closing out the album is Bar No One, a Piano filled, softly sang track that feels like a homage to the Blue’s filled Pop-Rock that the ’80s loved so fondly. 

All in all, The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City is simultaneously a love letter to the 80’s while also taking a modern approach to the songs thanks to the blending of genres. While there are a couple of tracks in the middle I felt ruined the pacing and flow of the record, this is yet another great release from one of American Rock and Roll’s modern forerunners and a good take on the sounds that helped pave the way for both modern Rock and Pop music.

The Deadbeat Bang of Heartbreak City is out Jan 10th via Bridge 9 Records.

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Review: Daniel Stapleton

 

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